Art and Design Series. Shibui & Illusion

Shibui Found Image Art creates its own illusion. How the mind interprets what it sees is up to the mind of its creator, and the resulting solution of what is found. This Shibui is not completed, you can see my efforts to find what is there with the outlines. Outlining with Black India Ink is the process of design. The light blue watercolor tint in this foundation flip-flops between being a field, with the darker blue as an event. Or as a mass becomes the event. Its outer edges remind me of some kind of animal whose head has ears that turn back, it has a long nuzzle like a horse. This head sits on broad shoulders. Somehow the rest is its body behind the darker blue “something.” I see the face of a dog, two eyes, a nose and it is darker under its chin, there is a possibility of one leg. The darker blue is becoming a goat in its arms. This is the illusion I have found. Other people may find what I see or see something very different. Once I find these things, then it becomes, how to solve what else is happening? What do these other things become?

When it comes to Shibui Found Image Art, Shibui creates its own illusions. What are illusions? According to the web; illusions is a perception, that changes over time. It is a term that refers to a specific sensory distortion___a distortion in the absence of stimulus, and illusion describes a misinterpretation of a true sensation. Defined it is something false and not factual, it tricks the human brain into thinking it is unreal or real. It misleads the perception of readers, viewers and deceives their senses.

A foundation is interpreted information that comes from the mind of its creator.

Most illusions are understood as “a calculated denial of dominance”. Moreover, “illusions present two sets of conflicting or contradictory signals in the mind. These signals are typically of equal strength and compete for the viewer’s attention; neither is dominant. The logic of the visual process is temporarily disrupted and the eye becomes overstimulated. It questions what it sees. Which thing is it? As a result, we may see, or think we see, a variety of optical illusions such as vibrations, afterimages, ghost images, flashes, glow, or shimmers. However, such illusions are short-lived, for the eye quickly fatigues under the degree of stress and strain. Our cognitive skills are similarly distressed. We may become confused because, without the help of dominance, it is difficult to distinguish between field and event. The usual rationale hierarchy becomes defunct; we are faced with an irrational, reversible field event relationship.

“Most illusions are based on a calculated denial of dominance. Like paradoxes, they present two sets of conflicting or contradictory signals. These signals are typically of equal strength and compete for the viewer’s attention; neither is dominant. The logic of the visual process is temporarily disrupted and the eye becomes overstimulated. As a result, we may see, or think we see, a variety of optical illusions such as vibrations, afterimages, ghost images, flashes, glow, or shimmers. However, such illusions are short-lived, for the eye quickly fatigues under the degree of stress and strain. Our cognitive skills are similarly distressed. We may become confused because, without the help of dominance, it is difficult to distinguish between field and event. The usual rationale hierarchy becomes defunct; we are faced with an irrational, reversible field event relationship.”

Think of a boat mirrored in the water around it. The reflection of the boat creates an illusion, giving the boat a new appearance. Yet this is not the real shape of the boat. Next, think of the black and white profile image vase. This vase looks like two people looking at each other or it flips to look like a vase. Illusions such as this are fun to look at. However, this is one kind of illusion. Think of images that look like two different things. Illusions such as these work because they flip back and forth from one thing to another as the eye, and the mind works to solve the puzzle it takes in.

This is one of my photos, and it makes a good argument about color creating interest and beauty, it has deep shadows that make the colors stand out. The photo is rich and vibrant. As a painting it would require more than green to make those green leaves, the camera has picked up on blue. This blue, and purple were there, I did not know just how much of it I would get. Very pleased with its result. When creating this same kind of illusion in a Shibuii, it works in a similar fashion. Myself, I can draw up my years of experience. The skills I have acquired over years of being an artist are brought into my toolbox.

Even when we paint landscapes we paint through the use of illusion, if you have ever tried to paint the forest with just the greens from the tubes of oil paints you have as the palette you quickly learn the trees, the grass in your landscape fail to work well. There is not enough difference. The green becomes too dominant. And dominance does not have a very large role to play when it comes to illusion. Remember, Illusion is based on a calculated denial of dominance. For the greens to work well, other colors such as purple and blue help tremendously. Yet these non-green colors create the right kind of illusion for the sake of realism.

A lot of research has been done about sensory perceptions, and how we understand them. We understand through our senses.

This Shibui has made its own story. I worked around the page, useing the edges of shapes to define what was found. A fanciful landscape, this has simplicity and it reminds me of the drawings created as a child.

“Illusions are meaningful and instructive”, they are “doubly valuable for reminding us about the elusive nature of perception. The eye sees, but the brain makes sense of it. Under normal conditions, it is an effortless and automatic process like breathing.” Illusions work, the brains figures out what it is seeing; flip-flopping between the two answers. it has determined.”

My discovery here, aquatic plants. There is a light brown event coming in from the edge on the right I would like you to notice. I was not sure how to solve this. When I come across things I don’t know how to solve, I do this last. Sometimes I put a Shibui away. The question became “How do I make this work with the overall image. This Shibui would work better if the shading were darker. The blue behind the plant could have been darker.

So, what is really happening when we see illusions? “Illusions deny rational relationships by preventing us from seeing both fields and events at once. Our minds flip-flop. Field-event relationships are designed to guarantee that we do not see them both at once.” Depth perception is another component of illusion. We build upon the illusion of distance. What is further away is smaller, what is closer is larger. That is further away something is, it appears darker, more condensed, a mass. As the eye defines as becoming closer to us, the view becomes a range from that darkest color into a chromatic scale that ranges from dark to mid-range colors to the lightest range of colors. This happens due to the illusion of a light source. the immediate foreground is something we either treat as being light or dark such as if we create the illusion of being among trees or shrubs.

This is an unfinished version of a Shibui. I created an intentional horizon for the background. And deepened the shadows. And I added a source of light.
I wish to point out the illusion of creating the leaves in this Shibui. To create the effect of rounding up of leaves, color, is put to use. Dark colors bring the veins deeper, lighter greens and yellows bring them up. Going darker underneath the leaves creates shadows between plans and the ground. This is intentional work, and if not worked in the way the image would be flat. A light source is vital for shading.
This Shibui is left simple, an abstract about color, and shape.

When it comes to Shibui and illusion, a lot depends on the found image, and to what lengths you take the illusion. For example, the space behind or around the events in the image may need a realistic background where grass, distance trees, or other things exists. Or if it is underwater, the illusion of aquatic life. However, some Shibui events, and supportive smaller events; “sit” in another kind of field, as if they hold a presence in space, in time. They exist in a world of their own, perhaps not unlike the story of “Horton Hears A Who!” Shibui creates its own brand of characters.

This Shibui is by Jacobie Pouliot. I love how she solved this image. It lacks a horizon line, but that does not seem to matter, The twin trees and limb of another tree” make the connecting events, and therefore the illusion of an almost barless tree? There are some supportive smaller events. Some are intentional objects and serve as smaller events that support the larger event and create the story. There is some depth of field due to the splatters. I like how the green from seems to say “I too am an event!” Other things in the image have a sense of movement, and these things look like they will turn into something any second! Things like leaves, and animals.

This information comes from Phil Paratore’s book Art and Design and myself. A book that explains, field and event theory very well. I teach from this book at Anisette Studios and find it very useful in discussions about Shibui Found Image Art.

By Pejj Nunes

I live in Southern Maine. I am the owner of Anisette Studios. My website is https://www.anisettestudios.com/ Here you can view and purchase Shibui, sign up for my newsletters, blog, and read articles about Shibui Found Image Art. Patrons get great deals several times a year and special items at times. My site makes it easy to contact me. My primary art form is Shibui Found Image Art. Shibui begins with action art and stems from the imagination. It is like seeing something in the clouds or solving a puzzle. Its creative process has its own rules and requires what I call reverse engineering due to a lack of an understructure and purely out of the imagination. In addition to those who patron me, my target groups are those who use art therapy. I will soon be teaching live. Contact me if you would like to learn live. I use Zoom. I request that although my art, other images, and what I write is now published by me here on WordPress; I do ask you do not to use my artwork, poetry, or the information about Shibui Found Image Art without my permission. I am quite available to make such requests. I wish to share the following: The existentialist philosopher Simone de Beauvoir wrote a book called The Ethics of Ambiguity. In it, she lays out a guiding ethic in response to the philosophy of existentialism. It might be somewhat familiar to you already. She writes, “To will oneself free is also to will others free. This will is not an abstract formula. It points out to each person concrete action to be achieved.” Best wishes to all! Have good times and keep safe! Pejj

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