Art And Design Series.

As with Claude Monet’s Water Lillies, there is a continuum in this chalk pastel painting. Here unity is seen, and the field has been established. Understanding terminologies like continuum, field, and field-event give us a language to express our thoughts about the processes of art.

A Continuum

Examining visual models where both fields and field-event relationships exist you will find “conceptual polarities on a theoretical design continuum.” What does this mean exactly? The meaning is found in the following words. “The continuum itself graphically symbolizes unity.”. A central principle of the field-event theory is that designs typically establish visible orientation with either the field polarity or the field-event polarity of the resulting continuum.” The examples given in “Art and Design” by Phil Paratore are of Monet and Rembrandt’s paintings as comparisons of field and field-event. These work well, look up Claude Monet’s Water Lillies, and examine the artwork of Rembrandt. Claude Monet would be considered a fine example of a field-oriented design. Think of how the lilies lay on the water, where the islands of lilies are, and think of how you travel as the view through this painting. You care lead by its continuum into the work. Rembrandt’s paintings on the other hand would be seen as being field-event oriented. There is unity in both, Monet and Rembrandt’s paintings. A field supports an event.

I do find that the field and field event theory holds true to a polar juxtaposition as being components of a continuum. This theory is a good model for the organization of information. When we create art, it is laying out information for whoever views it, as well as the self. A painting is full of information! Critiques are where we layout this information, it is what gets noticed or broken down into a process. It requires questions of us.

Monet’s Lillies are a fine example. How he painted them, there is a beautiful chosen composition.

Phil Paratore points out that “the organization found in such work goes beyond design, beyond perception, conceptual meaning, and beyond learning, language, behavior, and structure in both animal and human societies.”

I find that design alone does not make an image work. Nor does its conceptual meaning give it credence by itself. Continuum in artworks to create the whole and give the order, its end game unity.

By Pejj Nunes

I live in Southern Maine. I am the owner of Anisette Studios. My website is https://www.anisettestudios.com/ Here you can view and purchase Shibui, sign up for my newsletters, blog, and read articles about Shibui Found Image Art. Patrons get great deals several times a year and special items at times. My site makes it easy to contact me. My primary art form is Shibui Found Image Art. Shibui begins with action art and stems from the imagination. It is like seeing something in the clouds or solving a puzzle. Its creative process has its own rules and requires what I call reverse engineering due to a lack of an understructure and purely out of the imagination. In addition to those who patron me, my target groups are those who use art therapy. I will soon be teaching live. Contact me if you would like to learn live. I use Zoom. I request that although my art, other images, and what I write is now published by me here on WordPress; I do ask you do not to use my artwork, poetry, or the information about Shibui Found Image Art without my permission. I am quite available to make such requests. I wish to share the following: The existentialist philosopher Simone de Beauvoir wrote a book called The Ethics of Ambiguity. In it, she lays out a guiding ethic in response to the philosophy of existentialism. It might be somewhat familiar to you already. She writes, “To will oneself free is also to will others free. This will is not an abstract formula. It points out to each person concrete action to be achieved.” Best wishes to all! Have good times and keep safe! Pejj

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