Good Morning Sunshine! Thoughts on Writing Poems.

Sometimes it’s time to let a poem sit a bit.

Sometimes it’s simply a time to do something else and to stop working on a poem. Let it sit and come back to read it with fresh eyes. I have two poems at this time to come back to. (Some blogs are like this too.)

In case you are not a fellow poet or writer___ Overworking a poem may mean losing the contextual significance of the poem. Context is important and punctuation is equally if not more important because puncuations direct the writer and reader. If it’s there it has a purpose so that sentences flow as intended. The placement of punctuations matters because the period acts as a stop sign, a common like a yield sign, and a semicolon is made of both which means you stop a bit longer so to check the connection of the two trains of thought you have just married together. These thoughts should have a commonality.

Sometimes I will cut and paste the whole poem not to lose what is there, and work the second copy.

Meanings of words are very important and one should look them up to check on the meanings. Usually, there is this moment in writing where you listen to your gut. Words are seductive at times, but they still may not be the ones to use.

I consider what each sentence is saying. It’s important to read the poem out out-loud. Reading out loud means you hear the cadence of the poem.

Writing poems about what you personally experience is a good place to begin. Reading poetry, and books teach many things when you observe how other writers use their words and punctuation.

Living life, being out in the world, observing life is important. This does not mean you become a world traveler. It means observing daily life, and not spending all your life in your home. Not experiencing life happens if you are too comfortable with being home. As an example, I write and am an artist, what I do takes up a lot of my time right here. Housework, cooking needs to be done. It’s a self-contained life. A lot of time can go by before I finally make plans to get away from home. Today we are all forced to be home much more due to covid. What can be done is to make time to get out there safely.

“Ancora imparo” (I am still learning.) Michelangelo. John Drury wrote in his book Creating Poetry, “The first lines of a poem is a kind of door, an entrance into the rooms of the stanzas, an opening. There are many kinds of doors____. That first line is a lead through many kinds of doors.

By Pejj Nunes

I live in Southern Maine. I am the owner of Anisette Studios. My website is https://www.anisettestudios.com/ Here you can view and purchase Shibui, sign up for my newsletters, blog, and read articles about Shibui Found Image Art. Patrons get great deals several times a year and special items at times. My site makes it easy to contact me. My primary art form is Shibui Found Image Art. Shibui begins with action art and stems from the imagination. It is like seeing something in the clouds or solving a puzzle. Its creative process has its own rules and requires what I call reverse engineering due to a lack of an understructure and purely out of the imagination. In addition to those who patron me, my target groups are those who use art therapy. I will soon be teaching live. Contact me if you would like to learn live. I use Zoom. I request that although my art, other images, and what I write is now published by me here on WordPress; I do ask you do not to use my artwork, poetry, or the information about Shibui Found Image Art without my permission. I am quite available to make such requests. I wish to share the following: The existentialist philosopher Simone de Beauvoir wrote a book called The Ethics of Ambiguity. In it, she lays out a guiding ethic in response to the philosophy of existentialism. It might be somewhat familiar to you already. She writes, “To will oneself free is also to will others free. This will is not an abstract formula. It points out to each person concrete action to be achieved.” Best wishes to all! Have good times and keep safe! Pejj

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